Transit

A clock in the terminal at the Frankfurt airport. I was delayed 13 hours on my way back to Stockholm after the holidays. I got the opportunity to sit on the runway in DC for two hours and to hang out inside the Frankfurt airport for ten hours. A fancy

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Is this thing on? Can you hear me? Testing, testing… Today’s report is being broadcast to you all the way from Kentucky, in the heart of God’s Great United States. After finishing up a European tour with my band Metroschifter last month, I returned to my hometown of Louisville. A

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It’s another installment of pictures of regular, everyday things how they look in Sweden. This time it’s stuff on the street. Garbage can. Illegally-parked Corvette. Amazing. People who drive these things are jerks all over the world. What’s the Swedish word for asshole? An old Volvo limousine. Volvo emergency response

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Karlaplan is a picturesque area of Stockholm on the island of ֖stermalm where five major streets meet to form a star. Inspired by similar street plans in Paris, construction on the neighborhood began in the late 1800’s. The five tree-lined thoroughfares that go out in every direction have a dense,

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Saltsjöbanan is one of Stockholm’s oldest local rail lines. The 18-station line has been operating over 115 years and covers an end-to-end distance of about 11 miles (18 km).

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I’ve received a lot of comments and questions about my previous stories comparing the public transit systems in Louisville and Stockholm (or maybe I should I say: comparing Stockholm’s public transit system to Louisville’s lack of people trains). Those pieces can be seen at these links: 360° View from Slussen

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When I wake up and it’s raining, I feel how I imagine a dog must feel when you’re closing the door and leaving it in the house alone. The dog thinks you’re never coming back. That’s how I feel when it rains, like the sun is never coming back. Without

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These damn Swedish liberals are sooo permissive. Yes, you can park here and yes, it’s free, but we do have some rules: only in marked spaces and only for two days at a time.

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The Tunnelbana Station in the Stockholm neighborhood of Axelsberg has the name of the area spelled out in a giant glass, concrete, stone and iron sculpture that stretches the entire length of the platform. Each letter of the name “Axelsberg” is between 3 and 4 meters tall and built into

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My new favorite part of Stockholm is a neighborhood known as Kristineberg. Last week, I hung out in parks there a couple days in a row to enjoy the weather and scenery while buckling down for some studying of the Swedish language. During the summer break from school, I’ve decided

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As we’ve learned in several previous stories, Stockholm’s Tunnelbana (subway) system is often called “the world’s longest art exhibition.” Each station has been decorated by a different artist or several artists, and some stations were even designed as walk-through art by architects. This underground art project began in the 1950’s

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Here are some scenes from the Tunnelbana station at Bandhagen. The art installed at this location includes a gigantic measuring tape which bends through the entire station, from the outer sidewalk in front of the station all the way to the boarding platform. The station was built on one of

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This weekend will bring the Midsommar Festival in Sweden, a tradition which goes back many centuries and marks the longest day of the year. As you might have guessed, midsommar means “mid-summer.” Swedish ain’t so tough, see? This time lapse image from the Slussen webcam shows one photo from every

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The Blue Line Tunnelbana station deep beneath T-Centralen hub was designed in 1975 by Per Olof Ultvedt. It’s a multi-level station with monstrous caverns of exposed rock, gigantic escalators and moving sidewalks. My snapshots really don’t do it justice. Some professional images of the same sites can be seen at

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Last Thursday, I posted a story about the upcoming reconstruction of Stockholm’s central Slussen interchange. In detailing the project, I discussed how it reminded me of a gargantuan project in Louisville. I took the opportunity to compare the different approaches the two cities are following. Louisville’s undertaking involves the expansion

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Here is another 360-degree image I made recently in Stockholm. In this view from Slussen, you can see Gamla Stan (the old town) across the water, the circular Berg Arkitektkontor (Berg Architecture office) building, and Gondolen, a tall elevator-and-bridge observation structure. Click images to view full size Slussen is a

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